| NEWS NCAA D-1 coaches, Athletic Directors, and celebrities charged in nationwide entrance exam scandal by FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office in Boston.

TerryP

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rick4bama

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But Aunt Becky really!! really!!! wanted to get her boys girls into USC BAD!!!!
 

PurlJam

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Apparently the scammers focused on Olympic sports and/or schools that don't provide athletic scholarships (Ivy League).
May want to check the curling team coaches and the synch swimming coaches too. :p
 
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Judge Roy Bean...………..Justice, you sons of bitches!

Judge Roy Bean...………..There is a reward - for the righteous, courageous and the loyal. And that reward includes beer.
 

planomateo

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LOL, perhaps Standford wants to rethinking "nothing is given...everything is earned" given the situation they've found themselves in.

 

rick4bama

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Mom files $500 billion lawsuit in alleged college admissions bribery scheme

Meredith/AP) - A California woman is suing Lori Loughlin, Felicity Huffman and others charged in an admissions scheme for $500 billion, claiming they prevented her son from being admitted to several universities.

Jennifer Kay Toy, a former Oakland school teacher, filed the class action lawsuit on Wednesday against the defendants named in "Operation Varsity Blues."

She said her son Joshua and other legitimate applicants were denied access to many of the schools implicated in the sweeping college admissions scandal.


"Joshua applied to some of the colleges where the cheating took place and did not get in," Toy said in the suit filed in a San Francisco court. "Joshua and I believed that he’d had a fair chance just like all other applicants but did not make the cut for some undisclosed reason."

"I’m outraged and hurt because I feel that my son, my only child, was denied access to a college not because he failed to work and study hard enough but because wealthy individuals felt that it was ok to lie, cheat, steal and bribe their children’s way into a good college."
- Jennifer Kay Toy
The scandal erupted Tuesday when federal prosecutors announced charges against more than 30 parents, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. Prosecutors said the parents paid to rig standardized exams and bribed coaches to get their children designated as recruited athletes in sports they didn't even play, thereby boosting their chances of getting in.

It has since been dubbed "the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice."

Aside from Toy's lawsuit, several students have banned together to sue Yale, Georgetown, Stanford and other institutions involved in the case.


The plaintiffs brought the class-action complaint Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco on behalf of themselves and other applicants, asking for unspecified damages and the return of all application fees.

They argued that applicants who played by the rules were victimized when rich and famous parents paid bribes that enabled unqualified students to get into highly selective universities.

Legal experts, though, said the students could have difficulty holding the colleges responsible.
 

252BAMA

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Brings to mind when my daughter was applying for admission to college. Because of a favorite aunt who was head of nursing at a B'ham hospital, nursing was her chosen field. She experienced the extreme from both ends. She was turned down by UGA
on one end and on the other end Ole Miss wanted her so badly, I thought they were going to come to Georgia and just take her away. She received her BSN from the University of Alabama.

To this day I have never understood the UGA thingy, but perhaps someone bought her spot. But all's well that ends well. Because of it she hates UGA with a passion
, and has done extremely well in the thirty years she has been in that profession. She has RN, BSN, and MSN after her name on her business card. She has just accepted a new position at a 75% increase in pay which was already at six figures.
 

OldPlayer

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Brings to mind when my daughter was applying for admission to college. Because of a favorite aunt who was head of nursing at a B'ham hospital, nursing was her chosen field. She experienced the extreme from both ends. She was turned down by UGA
on one end and on the other end Ole Miss wanted her so badly, I thought they were going to come to Georgia and just take her away. She received her BSN from the University of Alabama.

To this day I have never understood the UGA thingy, but perhaps someone bought her spot. But all's well that ends well. Because of it she hates UGA with a passion
, and has done extremely well in the thirty years she has been in that profession. She has RN, BSN, and MSN after her name on her business card. She has just accepted a new position at a 75% increase in pay which was already at six figures.
It's hard for Georgia residents to get into UGA. Since the lottery and Hope Scholarship, more students have the ability to attend UGA. As a result, UGA narrows the candidate pool to the upper end of the GPA spectrum. Many kids are going to GCSU, Georgia State and other in-state schools and then transferring in (it's easier to transfer in than come straight from high school).
 

sk33tr

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Mom files $500 billion lawsuit in alleged college admissions bribery scheme

Meredith/AP) - A California woman is suing Lori Loughlin, Felicity Huffman and others charged in an admissions scheme for $500 billion, claiming they prevented her son from being admitted to several universities.

Jennifer Kay Toy, a former Oakland school teacher, filed the class action lawsuit on Wednesday against the defendants named in "Operation Varsity Blues."

She said her son Joshua and other legitimate applicants were denied access to many of the schools implicated in the sweeping college admissions scandal.


"Joshua applied to some of the colleges where the cheating took place and did not get in," Toy said in the suit filed in a San Francisco court. "Joshua and I believed that he’d had a fair chance just like all other applicants but did not make the cut for some undisclosed reason."


The scandal erupted Tuesday when federal prosecutors announced charges against more than 30 parents, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin. Prosecutors said the parents paid to rig standardized exams and bribed coaches to get their children designated as recruited athletes in sports they didn't even play, thereby boosting their chances of getting in.

It has since been dubbed "the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Department of Justice."

Aside from Toy's lawsuit, several students have banned together to sue Yale, Georgetown, Stanford and other institutions involved in the case.


The plaintiffs brought the class-action complaint Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco on behalf of themselves and other applicants, asking for unspecified damages and the return of all application fees.

They argued that applicants who played by the rules were victimized when rich and famous parents paid bribes that enabled unqualified students to get into highly selective universities.

Legal experts, though, said the students could have difficulty holding the colleges responsible.
$500 billion?!!! REALLY?!!! is she high?

so her son NOT being admitted to the college(s) of their choice somehow cost her $500 billion?

sure lady...whatever you say.
 

planomateo

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$500 billion?!!! REALLY?!!! is she high?

so her son NOT being admitted to the college(s) of their choice somehow cost her $500 billion?

sure lady...whatever you say.
It's a class action lawsuit with ~50 defendants as I understand. How many will be added to the class, who knows. But yeah, $500 billion is a bit ambitious.
 

TerryP

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It's a class action lawsuit with ~50 defendants as I understand
How large will that number grow? I'd think it's safe to assume there were a few thousand that didn't get admitted to some of these schools and their parents would have every right to join the suit.
 

BAMANEWSBOT

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When Lynn Swann was hired out of nowhere to become USC’s athletic director in April 2016, his lack of major college administrative experience was brushed away with a promise.

C.L. Max Nikias, then USC’s president, pledged that Swann would bring, “the heart and soul of a Trojan to his position.’’

After three years, it is a promise broken. With two scandals that drew FBI investigations having occurred under Swann’s careless and chaotic watch, the Trojans heart has been damaged, its soul tainted, and it’s time for a change.

In the wake of news that his program endorsed the admittance of fake athletes, it’s time for USC to retire Lynn Swann and find a real athletic director.
 

sk33tr

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$500 billion?!!! REALLY?!!! is she high?

so her son NOT being admitted to the college(s) of their choice somehow cost her $500 billion?

sure lady...whatever you say.
yeah, i know it's a class action suit. but the first sentence says that a woman is suing them for $500 billion. that way i read it, SHE is suing them for that much.
 

TerryP

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yeah, i know it's a class action suit. but the first sentence says that a woman is suing them for $500 billion. that way i read it, SHE is suing them for that much.
When it comes to class actions suits I believe the lead plantiff is named by the judge/court. Her name/inclusion here is only due to her being named lead plantiff by the courts. IF I understand this correctly, the court could have also named one of the other people who also filed:

The plaintiffs brought the class-action complaint Wednesday in federal court in San Francisco on behalf of themselves and other applicants, asking for unspecified damages and the return of all application fees.
On the other hand, I also believe that the lead plantiff ends up getting more than the others. I don't recall the exact numbers when Ticketmaster was sued (I think it was $1.50 per case, max of 15 or so for everyone else) but I do recall there were two lead plantiffs and they received 20K or so from that suit. IE: Lead plantiffs: 20K, other plantiffs, $25 or so maximum.

One question I would like an answer is which governing body picks the up reigns? The NCAA says academics aren't their thing until academics are their thing. However, now we're talking about sports programs being involved so that's a clear NCAA issue. I don't know what the version of SACS is for these schools but I'd assume they're under the same governing body as most colleges. It sure seems like this would fall in their wheelhouse because schools, which they accredited, are now breaking their own rules.

I'm not a big fan of a lot of the opinions from Bill Plaschke but he brings up a note here that carries a lot of weight in my view. We're at the beginning of the second FBI inquiry into collegiate sports and the only school I know of—which is one of his points in his article linked above—that's involved in both is USC.
 

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